Blog Archives

Have A Laugh Fridays – Incredible Toastmasters Speech!



Think back to those times when you laughed so hard, you had a hard time breathing for a moment, and even cried a little?

I had that experience in the fall of 2012 when I attended the regional Toastmasters Conference in Edmonton, Canada. Andrew Legg blew the audience away and won the humorous speech contest giving us his take on the “Different Stages Of Laughter”.

Please take a moment to share this one with his network, it is a truly remarkable job by a Toastmaster, not a professional comedian!

Have a great weekend!

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Do You Have “It”?

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All I wanted to do early in my sales career was manage the team that I was working on. I was young, I was new to the industry and I thought I knew it all! I was confident that some day I could handle the role. Unfortunately changes happened within the company, and I turned down my dream Sales Manager role when it was finally offered to me. Even with that setback, I have continued to follow sales and executive management throughout my career.

I did have some experience managing a team before I was ever interested in Sales Management. I was a Branch Manager in the car rental industry straight out of university. It was a great experience, and certainly taught me a lot about managing a diverse group of associates at a young age. Some of the employees were more than ten years my senior, and I learned very quickly how difficult being in charge could be.

The Sales Manager is arguably the most important person within the organization. They have a direct line of communication with the sales force; the associates who drive most of the front line revenue.

It can be very easy to get in to a rut with your day-to-day role. Sales reps certainly do, and it happens to managers as well. It is valuable to take a step back and think outside the box sometimes, from how you typically manage.

Great sales managers use enthusiasm and excitement to their advantage. They celebrate their team’s wins, while proudly announcing personal and team achievements. They may high-five team members in the office, or keep it simple and just pat everyone on the back when there are reasons to celebrate. The positive energy does wonders for everyone.

I have always been keenly aware of my manager’s actions, and I focus on a few areas:

  • how they lead the team
  • how they treat me
  • how they treat other reps
  • how they handle adversity within the team
  • the relationship they have with their immediate supervisor and others on the executive management team

If they excel in all the above areas, they probably have “it” with their team. “It” is hard to explain, but it can be summarized as the group is firing on all cylinders, and no issue is too great to break the cohesiveness within the group.

I have reported to a total of 16 assistant managers, sales managers and branch managers during my career. I have also had close working relationships with 12-13 executive managers. This has provided me a rich foundation of experiences.

  • As a manager what is it like to have “it”with the group of reps that you lead every day?
    • If you have “it”, you can probably describe “it” in general terms, but it may be hard to explain overall.
  • If you have never had “it” with your team, would you not like to know how to get “it”?

As I continue to discuss Sales Management in the future, I will build on the theme of having “it”. I will leave you with one other thought to ponder….

Are you just a boss to a group of employees, or is their much more depth to your relationship with the team?

Some Awesome Zig Ziglar Quotes!

I was flipping through the latest edition of the Toastmasters International magazine earlier this week, and stopped in my tracks when I spotted a Zig Ziglar article.

The late great motivational speaker, author and sales expert was known for many things, including creating memorable quotes. They included five awesome ones at the end of the article:

  • “If you go looking for a friend, you are going to find that they’re very scarce. If you go out to be a friend, you’ll find them everywhere.”
  • “Expect the best. Prepare for the worst. Capitalize on what comes.”
  • “Your attitude, not your aptitude will determine your altitude.”
  • “If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time.”
  • “People often say motivation doesn’t last. Neither does bathing – that’s why we recommend it daily.”

Make it a great Thursday!

A great message this morning about never giving up! Have a great day…

Goal Achievement Quote – Nov. 6, 2012

Great quote from Paul Mark this morning. We can all learn a little something from this one. Have a great day…

Goal Habits.com

“Make it a point to do something every day that you don’t want to do. This is the golden rule for acquiring the habit of doing your duty without pain.”
—Mark Twain   

__________________________________________________.

Enjoy today.
Achieve today.
Tomorrow is promised to no one!

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Neil Ducoff’s Take On Leadership!

I just loved Neil Ducoff’s take on leadership in this post. Take a few minutes to have a read. It is very inspiring…

No-Compromise Leadership Blog

One thing I’ve learned in my 62 years is that success never seeks you out. Success is about as indifferent and unemotional as it gets. It doesn’t give a hoot about your dreams and vision of what success means to you. It doesn’t care if you’re wildly successful today and lose it all tomorrow. Success is never in a rush. Success is just this extraordinary state that allows people, companies and organizations to bask in its glow and glory for as long or as little as they choose. There’s only one rule; show up and play to win. Otherwise, get out of the way.

I’ve been teaching, writing and coaching business and leadership for 40 years. I’ve had my share of successes and failures – but I keep showing up and keep trying to get better. When I look at my calendar and see keynotes, classes and consulting dates, I…

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Do You Have “It” With Your Team?

All I wanted to do early in my sales career was manage the team that I was working on. I was young, I was new to the industry and I thought I knew it all! I was confident that some day I could handle the role. Unfortunately changes happened within the company, and I turned down my dream Sales Manager role when it was finally offered to me. Even with that setback, I have continued to follow sales and executive management throughout my career.

I did have some experience managing a team before I was ever interested in Sales Management. I was a Branch Manager in the car rental industry straight out of university. It was a great experience, and certainly taught me a lot about managing a diverse group of associates at a young age. Some of the employees were more than ten years my senior, and I learned very quickly how difficult being in charge could be.

The Sales Manager is arguably the most important person within the organization. They have a direct line of communication with the sales force; the associates who drive most of the front line revenue.

It can be very easy to get in to a rut with your day-to-day role. Sales reps certainly do, and it happens to managers as well. It is valuable to take a step back and think outside the box sometimes, from how you typically manage.

Great sales managers use enthusiasm and excitement to their advantage. They celebrate their team’s wins, while proudly announcing personal and team achievements. They may high-five team members in the office, or keep it simple and just pat everyone on the back when there are reasons to celebrate. The positive energy does wonders for everyone.

I have always been keenly aware of my manager’s actions, and I focus on a few areas:

  • how they lead the team
  • how they treat me
  • how they treat other reps
  • how they handle adversity within the team
  • the relationship they have with their immediate supervisor and others on the executive management team

If they excel in all the above areas, they probably have “it” with their team. “It” is hard to explain, but it can be summarized as the group is firing on all cylinders, and no issue is too great to break the cohesiveness within the group.

I have reported to a total of 16 assistant managers, sales managers and branch managers during my career. I have also had close working relationships with 12-13 executive managers. This has provided me a rich foundation of experiences.

  • As a manager what is it like to have “it”with the group of reps that you lead every day?
    • If you have “it”, you can probably describe “it” in general terms, but it may be hard to explain overall.
  • If you have never had “it” with your team, would you not like to know how to get “it”?

As I continue to discuss Sales Management in the future, I will build on the theme of having “it”. I will leave you with one other thought to ponder….

Are you just a boss to a group of employees, or is their much more depth to your relationship with the team?

I have had the good fortune to correspond with Richard from time to time over the past year. I also read his blog when time permits.

This post caught my attention over the weekend. If anyone is thinking about owning a business, is attempting to “live the entrepreneurial dream, or wants a great read, this post is for you! Check out how Richard eloquently describes the need for a business coach.

Practicebetterbusiness's Blog

 

I Need a Business Coach

 

What is your intention and objective? What rationale are you using to determine your tenacity to reach your purpose?  Is your resolution resolute? Will your commitment and resolve match the desire of the want? What are you willing to do to reach your objective?

 

We all want success. I have never met any person that wanted failure. Sometimes success eludes us and it is difficult to understand and discover what is holding the success from overflowing the cup of wealth and desire. Often opportunities are pushed to the side and forgotten mainly due to our own ignorance to look past our own self absorb opinions. We live in this circle of what we know that binds and hinders our willingness to seek opportunities outside our realm of vision and beliefs.

 

Many business owners have hit the first of many curveballs thrown…

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Guest Blogger: Why You Need to Find – And Get In To – Your Discomfort Zone

Michael Boyette from the Rapid Learning Institute and The Top Sales Dog blog reached out to me last week, and I am so glad that he did! He is giving me the incredible opportunity to post content on his website, and wanted to contribute to Sell Lead Succeed! as well. I love his take on the “Discomfort Zone”. Initially it looks like a place we would not want to be, but upon further evaluation, it is very clear that we all need to take a leap of faith and “get uncomfortable”. Enjoy!

Your sales career is “doing okay.” You’re in the groove and your boss isn’t tormenting you. But something is missing. You know you can do better. Fact is, it may take a lot more than you think to get to that next level. Top sales achievers understand this, and recognize that growth comes only by setting stretch goals. And that the rewards come after the risk, not before. In order to sell, lead, and succeed, you must first escape your personal comfort zone.

Strategies for Escaping Your Comfort Zone

1. Commit to your vision of where you want to be

People change only when the pain of staying the same exceeds the pain of changing. So the only way to escape a comfort zone is to feel discontent with it. The first step: daydream. All meaningful, lasting change begins by fantasizing about where you really want to be (i.e., not in this comfort zone). If you vividly imagine yourself busting through sales barriers, being excellent rather that just average, eventually that picture makes its way into reality. When it does, the old comfort zone is unacceptable and we feel the need to change it. That compelling urge to change is what drives us to do things that make us uncomfortable, but lead to the rewards we want.

2. Write down what you need to do

When it’s on paper, with quantifiable tasks and deadlines, you make it urgent. Writing things down is the best antidote for procrastination, which is a defense mechanism that keeps us in our comfort zones.

Example: By the end of next week, I will make 50 cold calls in the new market, and set up five sales calls that will lead to one sale.

3. Recognize – and resist – the urge to crawl back to the comfort zone

Entering a discomfort zone is stressful. At the first sign of failure our impulse is to return to where we never fail. You’re going to feel that way. Expect it and resist it.

4. Just do it

Fear dissolves through participation. Think of bungee jumping. Most people are terrified of it, can’t sleep the night before, break out into a cold sweat when the ropes are tied to their feet. For many, it’s utter agony. They then jump and the fear is over. All they feel is the intoxicating high of having broken through a personal barrier.

The same is true of public speaking. How many times have you seen speakers who seemed nervous at first – which means that deep inside they were terrified – but became increasingly confident? We all overcome fear by doing.

5. Don’t fall into a new comfort zone

So you’ve broken through that first barrier; now you can relax, right? No. High achievers use their comfort zone to rest in, not to live in.

In the early 1990s Bill Gates was the richest man in America and Microsoft Windows had established itself as the dominant operating system. Gates could have become complacent. But he didn’t. He lived in utter paranoia that networking would put Windows out of business. By 1995 he was convinced that the Internet could destroy everything he’d built. Gates’ refusal to retreat into a comfort zone explains why Microsoft still dominates the software market, and the Internet, today.

A Final Thought

Successful sales leaders and entrepreneurs are not necessarily more competent, but they do look for ways to grow and stretch. They willingly expose themselves to new things by venturing into their own personal discomfort zone.

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Michael Boyette is the executive editor of  http://rapidlearninginstitute.com  Rapid Learning Institute’s Selling Essentials elearning site  and editor of the http://rapidlearninginstitute.com/top-sales-dog Top Sales Dog Blog. He’s also managed marketing and PR programs for DuPont, Tyco Electronics, and US Healthcare. Connect with Michael via email at topsalesdog@rapidlearninginstitute.com or Twitter @TopSalesDog

 

 

I came across this insightful post by Cathy Berggren yesterday and I wanted to share it now. I am always looking for posts that grab my attention, and what better way to make me stop in my tracks then a bowl full of M&Ms! The cool part is there is a wonderful message here as well for all leaders. Now I have to run to the store 🙂 Enjoy…

The Every Day Leader

Ever pick out your favorite colors in M&M’s when you eat them?  Are you drawn to a particular color?  Statistically, the company puts the highest number of blue in each container…in fact 24% in each bag.  Can you guess the least amount?  Yep, brown, an average of 13%.  Any guesses as to why blue is favored over brown?  I don’t have the answers, but have my own theory.

Blue stands out

We are drawn to people for the same reason. We are often drawn to those people who stand out. It may not be because they are loud or outgoing, or because they are some great leader by position, or because of their following or even their money.  It might be because of their gentle quiet spirit, or maybe it is how they consistently love people.  They may stand out because of their guidance and leadership to…

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